Education

  • Ph.D. 2009 – Stanford University, Learning Sciences and Technology Design with a specialization in Science Education
  • M.A. 2004 – Stanford University, Learning, Design, and Technology,
  • B.A. 2002 – Ewha Womans University, Korea, Health Education with a Secondary Teaching Credential in Health Education

Areas of Expertise

  • Technology design for science education
  • Science education
  • Equity issues in STEM education
  • Automated feedback
  • Technology-enhanced curriculum development
  • English language learners (ELLs)
  • Language and literacy in science education

Background

Kihyun “Kelly” Ryoo specializes in designing technologies to promote science learning for underrepresented minority students, particularly students who speak English as a second language. Through researcher-practitioner with low-income middle schools, she is interested in integrating innovative technology into science classrooms to improve public education for these students. She has extensive experiences in design thinking, technology design, and science education as a designer, a teacher, a curriculum developer, and a researcher.

Research

Kihyun “Kelly” Ryoo’s research focuses on promoting equity for underrepresented minority students, particularly English learners (ELs), in science education through the design and use of innovative technology. She is interested in the role of technology in supporting underrepresented minority students’ science learning aligned with the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS).

Her most current research explores 1) how real-time automated feedback can help ELs and their peers at low-income schools make sense of science using visualizations, 2) how to design teacher and student dashboards using interaction data from visualizations to support science teaching and learning, and 3) how different design features of visualizations can engage students in language-intensive science practices.

Her research has been supported by the National Science Foundation, the National Academy of Education, and the Spencer Foundation. She was a recipient of a National Academy of Education/Spencer Postdoctoral Fellowship and an NSF CAREER award.