Education

  • Ph.D. 2015 – University of Rhode Island – School Psychology
  • M.A. 2013 – University of Rhode Island – Psychology

Areas of Expertise

  • Suicide Prevention
  • Promoting Mental Health in Schools
  • School Connectedness
  • Bullying Prevention
  • Misuse of Prescription Medication
  • School Psychology

Background

Marisa Marraccini specializes in promoting the mental health and well-being of students and preventing health risk behaviors. Trained as a school psychologist, she became interested in supporting high-risk adolescents to prevent suicide and other health risk behaviors during her internship at a rural high school. Recognizing a critical need to better support these students, she sought out advanced training in suicide assessment research through a postdoctoral fellowship at the Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior in the Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University.

Her passion for teaching and mentoring school psychology students stems from her commitment to promoting social justice in school systems. By partnering with students, Marraccini aims to support developing school psychologists to act as agents of change using evidence-based practice to promote student success and equity within schools.

Research

Marraccini’s avenue of research aims to promote child and adolescent mental health in the context of their daily lives – school settings. Her research is focused on supporting vulnerable populations, including adolescents struggling with suicidal thoughts and behaviors, youth at risk for bullying, students with ADHD and executive skill weaknesses, and students using prescription medications nonmedically.

She is particularly interested in characterizing adolescent school experiences following psychiatric hospitalization, the application of school (academic and social) context to inform hospital interventions and school supports, and supporting transfer of information between hospitals and schools. Currently, Marraccini is leading a research study that will develop guidelines for school re-entry following psychiatric hospitalization and an inquiry into school predictors of recovery from suicidal thoughts and behaviors.